Press

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THE CURRENT ISSUE OF THE UK MAGAZINE, Eighth Day

”A brilliant, caustic talent for rhymes and raps (before there was such a thing in pop culture).”

...”Vanilla cemented herself as the first woman on the NY rock scene to make noise as herself, not as someone's wife or girlfriend.”

...”A sexually celebratory woman at a time when such a thing was threatening and looked upon with fear and loathing.”

...”There's no doubt that Vanilla's brazen sexuality-based show, which no other female performer at that time was attempting, was a perfect eye-opening road map for a young Madonna.”

GOOD TIMES ... 2000  

...”With aggressive rock ‘n' roll moves and a brazen theatricality, she convincingly portrays the lusty harlot whose pliable heart virtually melts at the onset of what else, True Love ... like Bette Midler at her best, Vanilla really makes you believe in those sentimental verities.”

LOS ANGELES TIMES ... 1977

“Vanilla's readings are so natural, she's often into a verse before auditors realize it. Some selections are hilarious.”

VARIETY ... 1975

”She's fearless on stage. Her projection is as strong as Jagger's, and she struts with the best of them. But she has the added dimension of being a good poet and actress, which give her performances a depth not normally associated with punk rock...I'd rather have scoops of Cherry Vanilla than punk from Johnny Rotten any day.”

Mark Perry, SNIFFIN' GLUE ... 1977

”Somebody should make a television series about a convent-educated Irish-American girl who becomes a high-flying advertising executive at 18, abandons her career to be a groupie, then becomes an actress, which she drops to become publicist for one of her rock star affairs, launching him to fame and fortune in the States, then starts writing porn-poetry about her groupie experiences, which of course she's asked to recite on stage, screen and TV chat shows, before finally ending up as a rock singer herself. They should put Cherry Vanilla in the starring role, and bill it as an everyday American success story. The only trouble is, nobody would believe it.”

DAILY EXPRESS (UK) ... 1977

”Cherry Vanilla proved to be one of the most amusing new artists ever.”

”It's hard to top Miss Vanilla.”

AFTER DARK ... 1975

”When Cherry's Bowie commercials came on your AM car radio, you didn't switch the station, you turned it UP!”

CHICAGO TRIBUNE ... 1975

”She's simply the essence of rock ‘n roll.”

CIRCUS ... 1975

”Cherry takes us though the horny world of the contemporary rock scene without missing a beat. It's the grand tour by an expert group leader who's risen above the flashy fleshpots of the rock world to become poet laureate of groupiedom, the bard of the hard.”

PENTHOUSE ... 1975

”Cherry Vanilla is for real, good/bad but not evil, a luminary among luminaries.”

CREEM ... 1973

”She tells outrageous tales about Bowie and the boys and girls in the band, filled with lurid details – but delivered with an astonishing innocence.”

DAILY MIRROR (UK) ... 1973

”A brilliant, caustic talent for rhymes and raps (before there was such a thing in pop culture).”

...”Vanilla cemented herself as the first woman on the NY rock scene to make noise as herself, not as someone's wife or girlfriend.”

...”A sexually celebratory woman at a time when such a thing was threatening and looked upon with fear and loathing.”

...”There's no doubt that Vanilla's brazen sexuality-based show, which no other female performer at that time was attempting, was a perfect eye-opening road map for a young Madonna.”

GOOD TIMES ... 2000  

...”With aggressive rock ‘n' roll moves and a brazen theatricality, she convincingly portrays the lusty harlot whose pliable heart virtually melts at the onset of what else, True Love ... like Bette Midler at her best, Vanilla really makes you believe in those sentimental verities.”

LOS ANGELES TIMES ... 1977

“Vanilla's readings are so natural, she's often into a verse before auditors realize it. Some selections are hilarious.”

VARIETY ... 1975

”She's fearless on stage. Her projection is as strong as Jagger's, and she struts with the best of them. But she has the added dimension of being a good poet and actress, which give her performances a depth not normally associated with punk rock...I'd rather have scoops of Cherry Vanilla than punk from Johnny Rotten any day.”

Mark Perry, SNIFFIN' GLUE ... 1977

”Somebody should make a television series about a convent-educated Irish-American girl who becomes a high-flying advertising executive at 18, abandons her career to be a groupie, then becomes an actress, which she drops to become publicist for one of her rock star affairs, launching him to fame and fortune in the States, then starts writing porn-poetry about her groupie experiences, which of course she's asked to recite on stage, screen and TV chat shows, before finally ending up as a rock singer herself. They should put Cherry Vanilla in the starring role, and bill it as an everyday American success story. The only trouble is, nobody would believe it.”

DAILY EXPRESS (UK) ... 1977

”Cherry Vanilla proved to be one of the most amusing new artists ever.”

”It's hard to top Miss Vanilla.”

AFTER DARK ... 1975

”When Cherry's Bowie commercials came on your AM car radio, you didn't switch the station, you turned it UP!”

CHICAGO TRIBUNE ... 1975

”She's simply the essence of rock ‘n roll.”

CIRCUS ... 1975

”Cherry takes us though the horny world of the contemporary rock scene without missing a beat. It's the grand tour by an expert group leader who's risen above the flashy fleshpots of the rock world to become poet laureate of groupiedom, the bard of the hard.”

PENTHOUSE ... 1975

”Cherry Vanilla is for real, good/bad but not evil, a luminary among luminaries.”

CREEM ... 1973

”She tells outrageous tales about Bowie and the boys and girls in the band, filled with lurid details – but delivered with an astonishing innocence.”

DAILY MIRROR (UK) ... 1973